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which his struggle for order has to be waged as Roman and imperial have,
indeed, already been discussed. Rome is, as has been mentioned, the main
(but not sole) location of the problems of ignorance, ¬‚awed judgement and
excess, which Galen confronts in On my own books and On the parts of the
art of medicine. The same tribulations are less localised in On the order of my
own books, and On my own opinions, but their imperial patterning remains
implicit, and this theme serves to connect all these treatises. The Greekness
of the ordering that these works, and the Medical art, strive to establish,
and enact, is also implied rather than explicitly asserted, indeed little actual
explanation is offered for the various sequences suggested at all. Still, there
are, again, certain shared patterns of identi¬cation and evaluation that can
be clearly discerned.
What emerges from the text of On the Order of my own books (at least as
it survives in Greek) and from the more summary listing of works at the
end of the Medical art, is a progression from fundamentals, from works
that establish basic epistemological principles and medical methodologies,
through the main parts of the art “ through knowledge about the human
body in health, about disease and sick bodies, and about cures, the recovery
(and maintenance) of health “ to various re¬‚ections on it, mainly in the form
of Hippocratic commentaries, then some extra philosophy and philology.102
The thematic arrangement in On my own books also follows roughly the
same course. There is, then, an intention to begin at the beginning, with
¬rst principles, with what a physician, or anyone who wishes to understand
medicine, needs to grasp right at the outset, before proceeding through
various logical stages of knowledge acquisition to a ¬nal consolidation,
elaboration and even ornamentation of the whole, although, as so often,
this intention is not entirely realised, since Galen actually identi¬es three

102 The Greek text has a lacuna of several pages, though fuller Arabic translations may survive.
276 reb ecc a fle mm i ng
possible starting points in On the order of my own books: the fundamental
pairing of On the best sect and On demonstration (also cast in the same role at
the end of the bibliography in the Medical art); the basic set of introductory
works (such as On the sects for beginners and On the pulse for beginners); and
(only admitted in the last line of the text) his treatise on the correct use of
words.103 The Medical art also begins its listing, as it does its summary of
the techn¯ itself, with works which describe the constitution of the art as a
e
whole, and in the context of the other technai too, for this is the point from
which to commence its break down “ dialysis “ into its part and provinces,
for de¬nition and description.104 On my own opinions also selects a distinct
set of fundamental issues with which to open.
Whatever the precise details, however things work out exactly, Galen is
in each case applying, attempting to apply, a logical, orderly, method. In
his mind, moreover, this type of systematic approach to things, working
from and through ¬rst principles, is Greek. It derives from a set of general
Greek intellectual values, and has, more speci¬cally, been forged through his
engagement with the greatest ¬gures of Greek thought: Plato, Hippocrates
and Aristotle, as well as Chrysippus and Epicurus. It possesses, moreover, a
kind of timeless truth, an absolute and abstract validity, that contrasts with
the mess, the errors, of the Roman present. If, then, on a basic structural
level in his works, Galen™s idea of good order closely resembles the Roman
imperial order; on the higher, more conceptual, level of the iatrik¯ techn¯
e e
itself, these works are to be ordered according to Greek ideals, however hard
that may be.
Once again, however, there is no contradiction between the two. The
timeless Hellenic truth is, even on Galen™s reckoning, a participant in the
present Roman mess, albeit a lamentably neglected and downtrodden one;
and many scholars of the ˜Second Sophistic™ would go further, ¬guring it, in
its very timelessness, as a creation of Roman rule.105 Galen™s ideal iatric order
nestles neatly within, as much as it transcends, the overarching architecture
of Roman power. Space for the technai, the artes, had been established quite
early on in Rome™s imperial endeavours; a contested space in many ways,
but productively rather than problematically so.106 All the way through,
then, in all his approaches to organising and presenting knowledge, Galen

103 Gal. Ord. lib. prop. 1“2 and 5 (SM ii 82.16“84.10 and 90.14“17); Ars med. 37.14 (392.9“12 Boudon).
For further discussion of this plurality see Mansfeld (1994) 117“26.
104 Gal. Ars med. 37.6 (388.4“8) (Boudon (ed.) (2000)).
105 So Swain (1996), 65“100; and see also, e.g., Bowie (1974).
106 Varro™s Disciplinae and Celsus Artes testify to this establishment, not to mention the proliferation
of technical treatises in both Greek and Latin under the Empire.
Galen™s imperial order of knowledge 277
remains in the Roman Empire; but this is a dynamic and diverse domain,
a complex cultural formation as well as a particular political structure, and
the two cannot be separated. Which is to return to the imperial interplay
between abundance and control, both for Galen and Rome. Both end up
striking a similar balance between the two, exerting their control through
formally similar mechanisms, imposing an order that allows plurality but
not chaos. So, Galen™s writing, the various systematisations he proposes
and enacts within, and of, his huge literary output, works for the Empire
as much as the Empire works for him.
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