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in chapter 3.
28. Richard H. Popkin, The History of Scepticism from Savonarola to Bayle (this
edn. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), esp. chapter 1.
29. See Tavard, Holy Writ, pp. 37, 53“6, 187; and under term in F. L. Cross (ed.),
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, 3rd edn, rev. E. A. Livingstone
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997). For typical English Protestant uses of
the term, see John White, The Way to the True Church (2nd impression, 1610),
esp. chapters 4“6, and his A Defence of The Way to the True Church (1614),
chapters 26“27, 35. For typical and untypical English Catholic uses, see below.
On Christian Pyrrhonism as practised by Catholics, see Popkin, Scepticism,
esp. chapter 3.
30. See David Cressy, Literacy and the Social Order (Cambridge: Cambridge Uni-
versity Press, 1980), p. 3.
31. A Briefe Discourse of Certaine Points of the Religion (1582), f. 29a; cf. his A
Dialogue Between a Papist and a Protestant (1582), f. 60a, and the discussion of
Gifford in Jeffrey Knapp, Shakespeare™s Tribe (Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 2002), p. 31 onwards.
32. See preface and notes to Religio Laici in Paul Hammond (ed.), The Poems of
John Dryden, vol. II, 1682“5 (London: Longman, 1995). All quotations from
the poem are taken from this edition. Simon™s Histoire Critique du Vieux Testa-
ment (1678) had been translated into English by Henry Dickinson (not himself
a Catholic) and published in 1682 as an anti-atheistical gambit. On Simon™s
thought and contemporary reception, see also Phillip Harth, Contexts of Dry-
den™s Thought (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968), chapter 6 et passim;
˜Interpretation, History of™, in The Oxford Companion to the Bible, ed. Bruce M.
Metzger and Michael D. Coogan (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993),
p. 323; Jonathan I. Israel, The Radical Enlightenment (Oxford: Oxford Uni-
versity Press, 2001), pp. 99“102, chapter 24 and p. 576. On Simon™s in¬‚uence
in England, see Gerard Reedy, SJ, The Bible and Reason (Philadelphia: Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania Press, 1985), chapter 5; and Harold Love, The Culture
Notes to pages 157“9 233
and Commerce of Texts (¬rst published as Scribal Publication in 17th-Century
England, 1993: this edn Amherst: University of Massachussetts Press, 1998),
pp. 300“2.
33. Following his Histoire Critique du Vieux Testament (1678), Simon was expelled
from the Oratory in Paris. See New Catholic Encyclopaedia, vol. 4; Dryden,
Poems, ed. Hammond, vol. II p. 81.
34. Conversely, Protestants could praise Simon for rescuing the Scriptures from
error and combating deism “ just as Dryden himself does in other parts of
the poem. See Dryden, Poems, ed. Hammond, vol. II p. 82; Harth, Contexts,
pp. 183, 193“6 (though cf. Israel, Radical Enlightenment, p. 452).
35. See glosses for these lines in Poems, ed. Hammond, vol. II pp. 124“5; Reedy,
Bible and Reason, pp. 114“18; and Harth, Contexts, p. 202. My reading differs
from the latter. Harth rightly points out that lines 252“3 have often been
mistakenly cited as proof that Simon was a scoffer at religion, and suggests
instead that Dryden is implying that Simon is a Protestant at heart; however,
this is hard to reconcile with Dryden™s picture of Simon as throwing doubt on
Scripture. Dryden seems instead to be temporarily casting Simon as a secret
freethinker for strategic purposes.
36. Harth, Contexts, pp. 202“3.
37. Poems, ed. Hammond, vol. II notes, pp. 124“5.
38. Quoted from The Poems of John Dryden, vol. III (1686“93), ed. Paul Hammond
and David Hopkins (Harlow: Longman, 2000), Part 2, lines 212“13, 216“21.
See also the introduction to the poem, p. 34.
39. Cf. Religio Laici, lines 342“55.
40. See Harth™s discussion of tradition in the poem: Contexts, pp. 281“4, 288“9. I
would wish to qualify his suggestion that Dryden ˜ignored™ the Blackloists, and
suggest that the poem draws on Blackloist metaphor while maintaining a more
mainstream understanding than theirs of the balance between Scripture and
tradition. Anne Barbeau Gardiner points out that Dryden follows the Catholic
theologian Abraham Woodhead in his use of the word ˜traditive™: ˜Abraham
Woodhead, “The Invisible Man”: His Impact on Dryden™s “The Hind and the
Panther”™, Recusant History, 26:4 (2003), pp. 570“88.
41. See Tavard, Holy Writ. Robert Morgan comments that ˜the authority to de¬ne
and defend the pattern of Christian truth devolved upon an episcopal lead-
ership authenticated by its standing in an apostolic succession and able to
provide a visible focus for unity™: ˜The Bible and Christian Theology™, chapter
8 in John Barton (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Biblical Interpretation
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), p. 119.
42. See Introduction, p. 14; Tavard, Holy Writ, pp. 72“6. The Blackloists take their
name from ˜Blacklo™, an alias of Thomas White™s.
43. Exomologesis (1st edn 1647), p. 194, discussed in Tavard, 17th-Century Tradition,
p. 118 (see also pp. 178“9).
44. On the Blackloists, see Dorothea Krook, John Sergeant and his Circle (Leiden:
E. J. Brill, 1993); Beverly C. Southgate, Covetous of Truth (Dordrecht/London:
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1993), ˜“Cauterising the Tumour of Pyrrhonism”:
234 Notes to pages 160“2
Blackloism Versus Scepticism™, Journal of the History of Ideas, 53 (1992), pp. 631“
45, and ˜“White™s Disciple”: John Sergeant and Blackloism™, Recusant History,
24:4 (1999), pp. 431“6; Jeffrey R. Collins, ˜Thomas Hobbes and the Blackloist
Conspiracy of 1649™, HJ, 45:2 (2002), pp. 305“31. Blackloist thought on Scrip-
ture and the rule of faith is discussed in Harth, Contexts, chapter 8, and Tavard,
17th-Century Tradition, chapter 10 (p. 223 speci¬cally on Sergeant). See also the
ODNB articles on Sergeant, Rushworth and White.
45. This tract was written by William Rushworth but edited and published after
Rushworth™s death by Thomas White, who added to it in a later edition of 1654:
see Beverly C. Southgate, ˜A Note on the Authorship of Rushworth™s Dialogues™,
Notes and Queries, 226 (1981), pp. 207“8. See also Thomas White, An Apology
for Rushworth™s Dialogues (1654); Serenus Cressy, The Church-History of Great
Britain (1668), fols. e3b, ´1a, and Exomologesis, section 2. On Rushworth, see
´±
ODNB and Tavard, 17th-Century Tradition, chapter 7 (written in the belief
that White was the author of the Dialogues).
46. 17th-Century Tradition, p. 179.
47. There were several editions in 1665: quotations are taken from Wing S5295.
Many of Sergeant™s points are anticipated in a less systematic manner in writings
by other members of the group: e.g. John Belson, Tradidi Vobis (1662).
48. The Rule of Faith: Or an Answer to the Treatise of Mr. I. S. Entituled, Sure-
Footing, &c. (2nd edn 1676), p. 319. Edward Stilling¬‚eet™s A Reply to Mr. J. S.
his 3d Appendix (1675) is bound together with this edition in some copies (e.g.
the British Library™s).
49. A Brief Treatyse Settynge Forth Divers Truthes (1547), f. D8r, quoted in Ellen A.
Macek, The Loyal Opposition, Studies in Church History 7 (New York: Peter
Lang, 1996), p. 121. I am grateful to James Austen for this reference.
50. On the relationship of orality and Scripture, see William A. Graham, Beyond
the Written Word (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987).
51. On the limits to Sergeant™s notion of oral tradition, see Tavard, 17th-Century
Tradition, p. 225.
52. See also Rushworth™s Dialogues, dialogue 2.
53. On this point more generally, see Bruce M. Metzger, The Canon of the New
Testament (Oxford: Clarendon, 1987).
54. Cf. Tavard™s discussion of Serenus Cressy™s thought: 17th-Century Tradition,
pp. 116“18.
55. Cf. Donne, Satire 3: ˜ask thy father which is [true religion] / Let him ask his . . .™
(quoted from Selected Poetry, ed. John Carey (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
1996), lines 71“2, p. 8).
56. On Catholicism™s concern to dissociate itself from ideas of a ˜secret tradition™,
see Moran, Scripture and Tradition, p. 31.
57. Devotions, 3rd edn (1684), p. 170. These verses appear to paraphrase a passage
from Henry Turberville, A Manual of Controversies (1654), p. 108. John Sergeant
wrote the dedication to the second edition of the Devotions (1672).
58. Tavard, 17th-Century Tradition, pp. 188, 196.
59. 17th-Century Tradition, pp. 237“9.
Notes to pages 162“6 235
60. The Rule of Catholick Faith, trans. Edward Sheldon (1660), p. 1.
61. Rushworth™s Dialogues, fols. ***5b“6b, p. 48.
62. On the ubiquitous idea that the father should be the primary instructor within
a household, see (e.g.) Sir Robert Filmer, Patriarcha and Other Writings, ed.
Johann P. Sommerville, Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), ˜Patriarcha™, p. 12.
63. Bossy, English Catholic Community, esp. pp. 60“74.
64. By emphasising Sergeant™s thought rather than his political machinations,
this chapter can be read as qualifying John Bossy™s judgment that ˜Sergeant™s
career . . . was a long, skilful, but increasingly desperate rearguard action™
(English Catholic Community, p. 67).
65. This is one of the central arguments in English Catholic Community.
66. On the low ratio of Catholic priests to lay people at this date, see Alexandra Wal-
sham, ˜Translating Trent? English Catholicism and the Counter-Reformation™,
Historical Research, 78 (2005), pp. 288“310, reference p. 294.
67. For a classic discussion of the relationship between religion and intellectualism,
see Max Weber, The Sociology of Religion, trans. Ephraim Fischoff (London:
Methuen, 1965), chapter 12.
68. Bossy, English Catholic Community, chapter 7; Marie B. Rowlands, ˜Recusant
Women, 1560“1640™, chapter 5 in Mary Prior (ed.), Women in English Society,
1500“1800 (London: Methuen, 1985).
69. See Introduction, pp. 13“14, and the de¬nition of ˜socialisation™ in William
Outhwaite and Tom Bottomore (eds.), The Blackwell Dictionary of Twentieth-
Century Social Thought (Oxford: Blackwell, 1993).
70. See Harth, Contexts, pp. 252“3; ODNB under Sergeant; Tavard, 17th-Century
Tradition, pp. 237“8 and chapter 12.
71. Bossy, English Catholic Community, p. 68.
72. Bossy, English Catholic Community, pp. 25, 32, 49, 60, 70“1.
73. See Robert Perks and Alastair Thomson (eds.), The Oral History Reader
(London: Routledge, 1998), part 1, for a comprehensive survey of the argu-
ments for the validity of oral evidence.
74. See Introduction, esp. p. 15.
75. On post-Reformation Catholic catechisms, see Patricia Demers, Heaven Upon
Earth (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1993), chapter 4; Ian Green,
The Christian™s ABC (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), appendix 1; Sister Marian
Norman IBVM, ˜John Gother and the English Way of Spirituality™, Recusant
History, 11:6 (1972), pp. 306“19.
76. Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe (London: Temple Smith, 1978). See
also Introduction, pp. 17“18.
77. See Phebe Jensen, ˜Singing Psalms to Horn-Pipes: Festivity, Iconoclasm, and
Catholicism in The Winter™s Tale™, Shakespeare Quarterly, 55:3 (2004), pp. 279“
306; and Alexandra Walsham, ˜Holywell: Contesting Sacred Space in Post-
Reformation Wales™, chapter 11 in Will Coster and Andrew Spicer (eds.), Sacred
Space in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).
78. The Pilgrim™s Progress, ed. Roger Pooley (London: Penguin, 2005).
236 Notes to pages 167“8
79. This formulation is indebted to Philip V. Bohlman, The Study of Folk Music in
the Modern World (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988), chapter 2.
80. For the de¬nition of ˜oral history™, see Introduction, p. 18.
81. These similarities are apparently fortuitous (Stanley Hauerwas, personal com-
munication, 2005).
82. Stanley Hauerwas and William H. Willimon, Resident Aliens (Nashville: Abing-
don, 1989) and Where Resident Aliens Live (Nashville: Abingdon, 1996). See also
Stanley Hauerwas and Samuel Wells (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Chris-
tian Ethics (Malden, Mass./Oxford: Blackwell, 2004).
Index




Acquaviva, Claudio 145 Barclay, John 228
Adams, Thomas 204 Barham, R. H. 191
Ady, Thomas 78 Barkworth, Mark 125“6, 127
Aelfric 155 Barlow, Dom Edward Ambrose 115, 147“8, 150
Agazzari, Alphonsus 138 Barlow, Thomas 26
Alane, Alexander 153 baroque viii
Aldcliffe Hall, Lancaster 131 Barritt, Thomas 147
Alencon, Duc d™ 138
¸ Bartholomew, St 117
All Souls™ Day 58 Baxter, Elizabeth 142
allegory 65, 67, 104 Bellarmine, St Robert 102
Allen, William 97 Bellenger, Dom Aidan 141
Allen™s ˜Articles™ 16, 95“103 Belson, John 234
Anderton, Robert 124“5, 126 Bentley, Richard 191
Andrew, St 117 Berkshire: see Enborne
Andrewes, Lancelot 188 Berry, Mary 191
anecdote ix, 2, 3, 20, 24, 139 Bible:
animadversion 10 Apocrypha: see Tobit
animism 204 New Testament: see Corinthians, Revelation,
annotation of texts 84 Thessalonians
anonymity 8 Old Testament: see Ezekiel, Isaiah, Kings,
anti-Catholicism ch. 2, 155 Psalms
Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet 191 reading 15
antiquarians 2, 5, 6, 24, 25, 37, 40“1, 48, 67“8, relationship of Scripture with oral tradition
147“8, 151 160“1
apocalyptic writing 91, 93 Black Mass 59“60
architectural memorialisation 115 Blackamor, Yorkshire 140, 141
Ariosto, Ludovico 76 Blacklo: see White, Thomas
˜art of memory™ 20 Blackloists 1, 13, 152, 159“65
Aubrey, John 5, 61, 62“4, 75, 79, 179, 204 See also Rushworth, William; Sergeant, John;
Augustine of Hippo, St 95, 113, 115 White, Thomas
Austin, John 162 Blackman, Mr 9
Blount, Edward 80
B., I. 105 Blundell, William 112, 124
Babington, Anthony 65 Blundell family 112
Bagshaw, Christopher 79 Boast, John 131
Baker, Augustine 176 Bohlman, Philip V. 129
Bale, John 64, 66“7 Bonner, Edmund, bishop 106, 113, 153
ballads ix, 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 13, 15, 16“17, 20, 112“13 Book of Sports 61“2
Ballin, Rosetta 49“50 Bossy, John 52, 146, 163
Bamber, Edward (alias Reading) 119“20 botanists: see herbals, plants
Barbauld, Anna 195 Bourne, Henry 63

237
238 Index
Bovet, Richard 30 Clifford family 153
Bowles, William Lisle 191 Colchester, Essex 9
Bradefalk, Kent 27 Coles, William 204
Brannon, Philip 42 collective memory: see cultural memory;
Brayley, E. W. 41“2 historical memory
Bristow, Richard 97, 212 confessorship ix, 12, 114, 115, 120“2, 129“30, 132
Broke, T. 215 conformists 4, 6
Brooks, Chris 49 conservatives, religious 5
Brown, Humfrey 188 conversation 2, 3
Brown, James 191 conversion 12
Brown, Theo 48 Cooke, Alexander 13
Bull, John 210 Corbett, Richard 77“8
Bunny, Edmund 84, 177 Corinthians, Epistle to the 124
Bunyan, John 166 Cornwallis, Sir Thomas 215
Burke, Peter 166 Corpus Christi play 5
Burnet, Gilbert, bishop 9 Cosen, Richard 9
Byrd, William 118, 125“7 Cosen family 9
Byron, George Gordon Noel, Lord 192 Cosin, John, bishop 49
Council of Trent 154, 160
Calvin, John 155 Covell, William 57
Cambridgeshire: see Wisbech Castle Crashaw, Richard 177
Camden, William 56, 63, 132 creeds 156
Camm, Dom Bede 141, 142“4, 145“6 Cressy, Serenus 153, 159, 187, 234
Campion, Edmund, St ix, 8, 56, 79, 108, 118, Cromwell, Thomas 64, 66
122“4, 132, 146, 212 Crowley, Robert 93“4
˜Campion™ as surname 132, 224 Crum, Ralph Adams 192
Candlemas 4, 58 crypto-Catholics: see church papists
canon, expansion of viii Culpeper, Nicholas 73“4
Canter, Laurence 143 cultural memory 21“2
carols 5“6 Cumberland, Earl of: see Clifford family
Cary, Elizabeth, Lady Falkland viii Cummings, Brian 10
Cary, Patrick 32“3
Caryll family 207 Dalrymple, Sir David 36
Castle, Terry 51 Danby Castle, Yorkshire 227
casuistry 12 Danby, John 142
catechisms 165 Darnton, Robert 137
Catherine of Aragon 50 Davidson, Peter viii
Catholic Relief Acts 52 debates: see dialogues
Catholic revival 5 Dei Verbum 230
current interest in Catholic writing viii Deloney, Thomas 173
See also: Gothic revival Devon: see Tavistock
Catholic survivalism 58 dialogues, controversial 83“5
Cecil, Robert 107, 108 Dickinson, Henry 232
Cecil, William, Lord Burghley 65, 67 Dillon, Anne 115
Challoner, Richard, bishop 131, 140, 144 disputations 12, 20
Challoner, Sir Thomas 30 dissenters 6
Charke, William 108 dissolution of the monasteries 23“4, 26, 31, 48,
Charles I 62 49
charms: see spells Dobin, Howard 65, 67
Chaucer, Geoffrey 207 Donne, John 113, 234
Chetham, Kent 67“8 Dorchester, Dorset 137, 139
Christchurch, Hampshire 4 Dorset: see Dorchester
Christmas 5, 79 Doughtie, Edward 2
church papists 4, 5, 107 Downes family 147
Clerkenwell Priory 30 Downes, Roger, Earl of Wardley 147“8
Index 239
Drake, Nathan 81 Fox, Adam 17, 106
drama 2, 10, 13, 20 Foxe, John 124, 232
continuance of religious drama after the Freeman, William (alias Mason) 132
Reformation 5 Frei, Hans 155
Drexelius, Jeremias 204 French Revolution 50“1
Dryden, John 79, 157“9, 161 Freud, Sigmund 51“2
Duffy, Eamon 4, 57, 87 Fulke, William 3, 208, 213
Dugdale, William 186 Fuller, Thomas 26

Edolph, Sir Thomas 27 Gabalis, Comte de 80
educated, the 7 Gannon, Fr 143
See also: literacy Gardiner, Stephen 215, 217
Egton, Yorkshire 115, 142 Garlick, Nicholas, Ven. 127, 135
See also: St Hedda™s Church Garnet, Henry, SJ 125, 134“7
Eisenstein, Elizabeth 74 Gasquet, Francis Aidan, cardinal 42
Elcius, Peter 120, 217 Gerard, John 134, 137, 139, 145
Elderton, William 123 ghost stories 24, 27, 30, 47“8, 137
elegy 95 Gibson, Edmund 26
Elizabeth I 9, 16, 28, 50, 108, 138 Gifford, George 156, 232
Elton, G. R. 64, 66 Gilbert, Nicholas Alain 141, 143
Enborne, Berkshire 103, 110“11, 156 Gillow, Joseph 148
English College, Rome 8, 59 Gilpin, William 41
English language, dif¬culties with among Glastonbury, Somerset 23
Catholics 8“9 Glastonbury Thorn 203
English Martyrs™ Church, Sleights, Yorkshire 143 Gloucestershire: see Wanswell
English Reformation historiography vii Goody, Jack 72
epigrams 10, 105 Gordon, Anna, Lady 100“1
equivocation 12“13 Gordon Riots 52
Essex 88 Gostwyke, Roger 188
See also: Colchester Gothic architecture 189, 193
executions 12, 20, 118“20 See also: antiquaries; ruins
exiles 128“30, 144 Gothic drama 48
Eyston, Charles 23, 24, 25 Gothic ¬ction 2, 24, 36“7, 48“54, 148
Eyston, Edward Francis 22, 23 psychoanalytical criticism 51“4
Ezekiel 92 Gothic Revival 42, 49
Graham, Kenneth W. 33
Fairfax family 31 grammar 10
fairies 14, 68, 75“9, 179 Gray, Thomas 39, 191
Falkner, John Meade 36 imitations of Elegy 42
Favour, John 4, 5 Gregory XIII, Pope 144
Featley, Daniel 12 Gregory, Brad 115
Fermor family 207 Grigson, Geoffrey 73
festivity 6, 166 Grose, Francis 38, 46, 193
religious festivals 5 Guise, Duke of 9
See also: hospitality
˜feudalism™ 18 Habermas, J¨ rgen 18
u
Fieldcock, Roger 125 Hackett, Helen 90
Filmer, Sir Robert 235 Haggerty, George E. 51
Fisher, Samuel 12 hagiography 114
Fitzsimon, Henry 105 Haigh, Christopher 16, 20
Fitzwilliam Virginal Book 89 Hale, Thomas 88
folklore 2, 37, 55“8, 63“4 Hall, Joseph 1, 149“52, 155, 167
Forbes, Patrick 100“1, 106 Hamilton, Donna viii
Foucault, Michel 114 Hamilton, Elizabeth 142
Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire 38 Hampshire: see Christchurch; Netley Abbey
240 Index
Harington, Sir John 200, 214 James, M. R. 36“7
Harland, John 128 James, St 117
Harrab, Thomas 104, 105 Jefferson, Joseph 192
Harris, Tim 18, 177 Jelin, Elizabeth 21
Harvey, John 76 Jenkins, David, bishop 188
Hauerwas, Stanley 167“9 Jensen, Phebe 84
Haydock, George Leo 141 Jerningham, Edward 192
Heal, Felicity 94 Jerome, Stephen 109
Helme, Elizabeth 191 Jesoppe, Mr 137
Henry VIII 48, 50, 65, 67, 87, 90 Jesuits 12, 15
heraldry, Catholic 224 Johnson, Samuel 36
herbals 73“4 jokes 137
Herrick, Robert 62 See also: puns
Heywood, John 176 Jollett, Thomas 125“6, 127
Hickeringill, Edmund 26 justi¬cation by faith 11
Hierarchomachia: Or, the Anti-Bishop 228
Hieron, Samuel 97“8, 99, 102, 104 K., E. 77
High Churchmen 24, 26, 27 Keate, George 39, 42“4
historical memory 21, 172 Kennett, White 187
historical trauma 21“2 Kent: see Bradefalk; Chetham; St Radegund
Hobart, John 215 Abbey
Hobbes, Thomas 77“9 Ker, Ann 191
Hogg, James 194 Kerman, Joseph 126, 127
Hoghton, Richard 129 Kiely, Robert 52
Hoghton, Thomas 128“30 Kilroy, Gerard ix
Holy Of¬ce 164 Kings, Book of 119
holy wells 56, 69 Kirk, Robert 205
Homer 63, 80 Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire 47
Hooker, Richard 155, 188 Knaresborough, John 119“20, 142
hospitality 94“5 Kunzle, David 93
Houghton, Norfolk 35
Howard, Philip, Cardinal 9 laity, Catholic 19, 162“4
Hufford, David 148 Lambarde, William 68
Huggarde, Miles 16 laments 7“8, 83, 87“92, 93“4
Hutton, Ronald 18, 55, 58, 150 Lancashire viii, 5, 119, 128
Lancashire witches 60
idolatry, de¬nitions of ix See also: Aldcliffe Hall; Lancaster; Sefton;
ignorance, fear of 5, 13, 81 Wardley Hall
illiteracy 10, 18 Lancaster 119, 131, 147
link with religious conservatism 3, 14, 19 Langdon, Thomas 87“8
illustration 10 Larkham, Thomas 65, 67, 77, 208
Inchbald, Elizabeth 49 Latin viii, 6“7, 109“10
Inquisition 164 See also: liturgy; Mass
inscriptions 20, 130“1 Laud, William, Archbishop 5
internationalism, Catholic 7, 8 Laudianism 187
Interregnum 5 Lee, Sophia 49“50
invisible church 163 Leigh, William 224
Ireland 20, 146 Lemnius, Levinus 72
See also: St Patrick™s Purgatory letters 2
Ireland, William Henry 195 L´vy, Maurice 51
e
irrational, the 52“3 Lewis, Sir Berkeley 39“40, 42
Isaiah 90 Lewis, Matthew 49
libels 8, 13, 82“5, 106“13
Jackson, Ken vii Lincolnshire: see South Kyme
Jackson, Thomas 70“2, 74, 75, 81 linguistic concerns of Reformation 10, 20
James I 61 L™Isle, William 155
Index 241

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